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Chen Guangcheng, Blind Legal Activist, Says Nine Commentaries is a “Thorough, Clear Understanding of the Evil CCP”

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Chen Guangcheng in Washington, June 25, 2014 (RFA)

The well-known blind Chinese legal activist, Chen Guangcheng, fled China in 2012, and now lives in exile in America. After he moved to the US, he spoke with a Tuidang researcher, on the significance of the Nine Commentaries on the Communist Party.

Regarding the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), Chen said, “that evil ruling group has no ideology except power, and their interests and benefits.”
Chen pointed out that the CCP focuses entirely on their control and monopoly of power. He said, “So long as that’s the case how can there be rule of law, justice, and how can the ordinary people have a good life?”
The Tuidang movement arose as people began to renounce the CCP in response to “The Nine Commentaries”.
 
“The Nine Commentaries on the Communist Party” were first published as an editorial series that began to run on November 19th 2004 in the Epoch Times, the most widely distributed Chinese language newspaper in the world. It provided Chinese people a comprehensive history and analysis of the nature of the CCP.
From its origins stemming from a branch of Soviet Communism, the CCP imposed a foreign ideology on China. Traditional Chinese culture maintained strong spiritual values throughout its 5,000 year history. All of this has since been destroyed by the CCP from the time it took control in 1949.
Since the founding of the CCP in 1921, the Nine Commentaries estimates it has either directly or indirectly caused the unnatural deaths of 60-80 million Chinese people.
The Tuidang movement became a way for Chinese people to liberate themselves from the guilt of being associated with the CCP, by renouncing the Party.
Chen says the Nine Commentaries is instrumental in giving the Chinese people a thorough, clear understanding of the CCP. “I remember the Tuidang number after 2008, after National Day in China, we heard that the Tuidang was as I recall 56,780,000,” he said. “So at that time, especially in the CCP prison, I heard this Tuidang number had been growing by tens of thousands per day. I knew it would scare them.”
Chen had been able to access the Nine Commentaries on the internet, and he was impressed with its content.
“I mean to say, the Nine Commentaries doesn’t tell people to overthrow the regime with violence, but just tells them from a spiritual sort of perspective to separate from the CCP,” he said.
The Great Firewall on the internet in China is designed by the CCP to prevent Chinese people from learning the truth about the corruption and evilness in the Party, but many have found ways to bypass it.
“At the time when I was in China after Nine Commentaries came out, I saw it through Free Gate. I saw parts of it. I thought that it spoke very, very well, very on point. Also, later I heard it on Sound of Hope broadcasts.”
Ten years ago Chen took his local government in Shandong to court for their vicious evil and illegal enforcement of the one child policy. As a reprisal, he was kidnapped and sentenced to four years in prison. Afterwards, he spent a year and a half in house arrest, which ended with his dramatic escape over a wall, breaking his foot in the process.
He made his way to the American Embassy in Beijing. Eventually he was granted asylum, and safe passage with his family to the US.
Chen was a fellow at New York University for twelve months. Currently, he is a visiting fellow at the Catholic University of America.

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