Global Tuidang Center

GLOBAL SERVICE CENTER

for QUITTING THE CHINESE COMMUNIST PARTY

Macau Commemorates 18th Anniversary of Falun Gong’s April 25 Protest in Beijing

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Minghui.org

People read Falun Gong and Tuidang materials. (minghui)

The plaza in front of St. Dominic’s Church, a popular Macau tourist attraction dating back to 1587, was the setting for an event to raise awareness about Falun Gong and the Tuidang (quitting CCP) center activity.

On April 25, 1999, approximately 10,000 Falun Gong practitioners gathered peacefully on the street facing Zhongnanhai, the Party’s central government compound in Beijing. They came to protest the unexplained arrest of some 50 fellow practitioners in the nearby city of Tianjin.

The 10,000 left quietly later that day after meeting with Premier Zhu Rongji and securing the release of those wrongly arrested in Tianjin.

Chinese Communist Party  (CCP) leader Jiang Zemin, had his propaganda ministry publicize the gathering not as the peaceful protest that it was, but instead as a “siege of Zhongnanhai”. A few months later Jiang launched the brutal crackdown on Falun Gong. Nearly 18 years of persecution have continued ever since.

Chinese tourist quit the Party

Display boards and banners were set up in the pedestrian area in front of St. Dominics.

Crowds of tourists stopped by, reading the materials, taking pictures and videos, and talking to practitioners. Many Chinese people took the opportunity to renounce Party membership with help from the practitioners.

One Chinese government official said, “What I can do to help you in China is really limited. But had I lived overseas, I would pass out flyers with you guys on street. The communist party is really evil. It has been many years since I last paid Party membership dues. The persecution of Falun Gong is wrong.”

He and three of his friends all quit the Party on the spot.

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