Global Tuidang Center

GLOBAL SERVICE CENTER

for QUITTING THE CHINESE COMMUNIST PARTY

Prominent Rights Activist Huang Qi Detained in China’s Sichuan

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on google
Google+

Ka Pa and Lin Jing  |  Radio Free Asia

huang-qi-RFA
Sichuan rights activists Yang Xiuqiong (L) and Huang Qi (R) before their detention, Feb. 18, 2016. (courtesy of activist Li Zhaoxiu)

Authorities in the southwestern Chinese province of Sichuan have detained a prominent rights activist after he went to investigate claims of an illegal government land-grab in the province.

Veteran rights activist Huang Qi, who founded the Tianwang rights website, was detained alongside three colleagues in Sichuan’s Mianyang city on Thursday, fellow activist Li Zhaoxiu told RFA.

Huang, Dujiangyan-based activists Yan Tafeng and Yan Tabing, and Mianyang activist Yang Xiuqiong, who invited Huang to Mianyang in the first place, remained incommunicado on Friday, Li said.

“I have no news of Huang Qi,” Li said. “He was taken away from Yang Xiuqiong’s home at around 10.00 p.m. yesterday evening by four people.”

“That morning, Huang had taken a Japanese journalist up to meet Wu Xianqiong, a victim of the May 12, 2008 earthquake in Dujiangyan,” she said.

“In the afternoon, Huang Qi, Yang Tafeng and Yan Tabing went to Yang Xiuqiong’s home in Mianyang, at Yang’s invitation,” Li said.

“There was an issue with a land grab and forced demolitions and evictions there, and they wanted Huang Qi to investigate it for them,” she said.

Li said she had heard about the detention by phone from Yang, but that she had been unable to get through since Friday morning.

“She told me that the four of them … were taken to the local police station yesterday evening, and they were still there this morning,” Li said.

“But after I spoke to her this morning, the phone was switched off.”

Li said more than 20 police officers had arrived at Yang’s home for the raid, but had no information about possible charges against the four.

An officer who answered the phone at the Chengjiao police station in Mianyang declined to comment on the detentions.

“I can’t verify your identity over the phone,” the officer said. “I only just got to work and I don’t know what happened yesterday.”

He declined to say whether the four activists were still at the Chengjiao police station on Friday afternoon local time.

A website for China’s most vulnerable

Huang was sentenced to three years in prison in November 2011 after launching investigation into shoddy school construction blamed for thousands of deaths during a massive 2008 earthquake.

Huang, 51, was convicted of “illegally possessing state secrets” by the Wuhou District Court in Sichuan’s provincial capital, Chengdu.

Huang’s wife Zeng Li said at the time that the court handed down a severe three-year sentence because of what it described as his “tendency to relapse into criminal activities” following his release from jail in 2005.

Huang launched the Tianwang website in 1999, initially to provide assistance to China’s most vulnerable citizens, but soon became involved in more contemporary rights work, in particular giving a voice to people displaced by government land grabs and forced evictions.

He was arrested June 3, 2000, on charges of voicing grievances for victims of the June 4, 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown and for sympathizing with members of the banned Falun Gong religious group.

After being sentenced on May 9, 2003 to a five-year jail term, Huang was released in 2005 after his pretrial detention period was counted towards the total.

Copyright © 1998-2016, RFA. Used with the permission of Radio Free Asia, 2025 M St. NW, Suite 300, Washington DC 20036

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on google
Google+

Related

Recommended

Hong Kongers Vow to Continue Pro-Democracy Pursuits Despite New Security Law

VOA News Residents in Hong Kong say an atmosphere of trepidation has permeated the Asian financial hub since the enactment of a sweeping national security law imposed by China.  But activists say despite new concerns of a clampdown on certain freedoms they will continue their pro-democracy pursuits.  The law passed by China’s legislature on June 30 and enacted in Hong Kong on July 1, punishes crimes of secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces with up to life in prison.    Since the enactment of the law, banners and posters that call for independence or even those critical of the government have disappeared from Hong Kong’s bustling streets. The government claimed the protest slogan “Liberate Hong Kong; revolution of our times” was illegal under...

Read more