Global Tuidang Center

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for QUITTING THE CHINESE COMMUNIST PARTY

Personal Experiences with the Restrictions of China's Internet

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The Censorship of China’s Internet

Interviews of two Chinese native born college students on their personal experiences with the restrictions of China’s internet

A native of Shanghai, China and a rising sophomore at Duke University

[caption id="attachment_5341" align="alignleft" width="188"]Sites That Don't Make it Through the Great Firewall (chinalawandpolicy.com) Sites That Don’t Make it Through the Great Firewall (chinalawandpolicy.com)[/caption]

Q: Lets start general, What are your overall feelings towards China’s authoritative rule over the web? Have you found that the presence of internet censors has had an impact on your daily internet use?

A: It’s really interesting to see how China’s government set up the sensor system, while its people has their way to crack the system. The New York Times news is one of the best news on this topic. the River crab one. We can’t use Youtube in China. It’s annoying!

Q: After reading about the personal tracking system I was shocked at the precautions that one must have to take in their everyday use of the internet. Are you extra cautious of what you type?

A: I am using a Mac, so I am not that worried about the hackers. But I do setup anti-virus, anti-hacker software in my parent’s computer. And I always email my parents to update the software, to better protect their information.

Q: If for some reason you needed to access censored material in China, Would it be possible?

A: Yeah, definitely it’s possible. We can use a foreign proxy to get access to the information. My parents’ generation definitely don’t know that.

Q: After coming to the U.S. for college and using the internet excessively for assignments and leisure, have you discovered anything new? has your perception changed about certain historical events?

A: That’s a good question. I watched a lot from youtube about 64, President Jiang, etc. I got changed, somehow. But even before I come here, I am aware that what the PRC government told me is not always the truth.

Q: Do you foresee the internet opening up Chinese society more to the world and transforming it into a more democratic regime?

A: Yeah, the government will gradually adjust its policy. The governor are becoming younger than before, so I expect them to accept the Internet culture more and more.

Q: And finally on a lighter note, What is the funniest banned video/website/blog that you have come across?

A: u can’t search 宋祖英 & 江泽民 together in Baidu.“根据相关法律法规和政策,部分搜索结果未予显示

An Example (Tuidang editor): Jiang Zemin and Song Zuying scandal

A native of Shenzhen, China and a rising sophomore at Mount Holyoke College

Q #1: Lets start general, What are your overall feelings towards China’s authoritative rule over the web? Have you found that the presence of internet censors has had an impact on your daily internet use

A: I used to have access to wiki in Shenzhen but I know I cant use it in beijing or Shanghai or any of those northern places.

China blocked wiki and youtube for a while and they reopened it I think after last year the Tibetan’s protest. But now youtube is blocked altogether.

Q #2: After reading about the personal tracking system I was shocked at the precautions that one must have to take in their everyday use of the internet. Are you extra cautious of what you type?

A: I was not aware of that. I think that if you post something anti governmental or politically sensitive, it will be deleted.

Q #3: If for some reason you needed to access censored material in China, Would it be possible?

A: Yes, both Hong Kong and Macau’s internet is not regulated. So, since Hong Kong is only a train ride away from Shenzhen, it is easy to access censored material there. I also know of people who have ways of accessing to the banned material, but I do not know how.

Q #4: After coming to the U.S. for college and using the internet excessively for assignments and leisure, have you discovered anything new?

A: I have watched the Tiananman incident on youtube. It was horrific. I think I had access to that video once in China.

Q #5: Do you foresee the internet opening up Chinese society more to the world and transforming it into a more democratic regime?

A: I think it is more and more difficult to control the free flow of information. Even if they censor it, there are still ways to get access to particular information if you live in the coastal are. There are also say, go on CNN, you will know everything. under the pressure of intl community, China reopened the censored websites because of the tibetans’ protest.

Q #6: And finally on a lighter note: What is the funniest banned video/website/blog that you have come across?

A: Not yet. Hong Kong TV is very outspoken about everything. When they broadcast controversial topics, the program will be blocked, so it is interesting when you did not know something happen in mainland and know that the government covered up when watching tv on the subway to Hong Kong.

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