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Awareness Grows in India about the Need for Freedom in China

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Poornima Raina  |  Tuidang Center [caption id="attachment_5250" align="alignleft" width="300"]Mubai-market2-PR A colorful Mumbai market (Poornima Raina)[/caption]

India celebrated the popular Diwali, the festival of lights, in the second week of November 2015. In addition to decorations and lighting various types of lamps, the festivities include bursting fire crackers, the colourful and the noisy ones.

As elsewhere in the world today, the Indian markets too are inundated with Chinese products, designed for the Indian festivals. It is well known that these are cheap and of poor quality. Particularly the Chinese fire crackers are noisier and create more pollution. They contain potassium chloride which is hazardous to children. As a drive to control the pollution during this festival season, the local government in West India had clamped a ban on Chinese fire crackers.  Following it up, the Customs and Directorate of Revenue Intelligence of Mumbai has confiscated consignments of Chinses crackers worth about 21million U.S. dollars. Such banned goods from China are shipped surreptitiously into Mumbai and other ports of India from Ningbo and Shanghai ports of China.

(http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mumbai/Rs-14-crore-noisy-crackers-from-China-seized-Customs-on-the-lookout/articleshow/49740647.cms)

[caption id="attachment_5251" align="alignleft" width="300"]Mumbay market, No Chinese products? (Poornima Raina) Mumbay market, No Chinese products? (Poornima Raina)[/caption]

The street vendors in India who sell festival items, normally call out the names of their products to attract the clients. This season in Mumbai, the vendors were calling out loudly “No Chinese products sold here!” and the buyers were carefully checking through the labels. 

Mr. Vilas Chavan, a business executive living in Mumbai, expressed his concern over the exodus of Chinese products in the market and the toxic materials used in them. He said, “ Here, we can avoid buying these. But the people of China have no choice!”In addition to the Government’s ban of substandard Chinese fire crackers, there was another factor which created awareness among the Indian consumers. That was the campaign held by the Falun Gong practitioners of the western region in India. They disseminated information about the origin of these Chinese products, made by the prisoners of conscience under severe oppression at the labour camps. They talked about how this peaceful mediation practice has been outlawed in China and the practitioners are subject to cruel persecution.

On seeing the Falun Gong practitioners practice in the parks of Nagpur, a reporter from a very popular local TV channel (AwaazIndia TV) in the western region of India, interviewed them to get more information about the persecution of Falun Gong in China. The news about the inhuman persecution of Falun Gong adherents in China for the past sixteen years raised awareness about the suffering of the Chinese people under the Communist regime and the need for their freedom.

Mr. Rajendra Phule of Awaaz India TV concluded the interview with a message to the viewers that India must play a role in stopping the persecution of Falun Gong in China and restoring freedom to the Chinese people. 

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