Global Tuidang Center

GLOBAL SERVICE CENTER

for QUITTING THE CHINESE COMMUNIST PARTY

Google Squished in China Once Again

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GOOG) products, including Search, Sites and Picasa, have been similarly targeted by agencies of the Communist regime in China that govern Internet and social media content. Data from Google’s Transparency Report shows Gmail traffic is slowly resuming, however its nowhere near previous use levels. [caption id="attachment_1983" align="alignleft" width="300"]Google targeted in China. (Image: Google) Google targeted in China. (Image: Google)[/caption] In 2010, Google became so exasperated by the Communist regime‘s censorship demands that it pulled its business out of the country altogether. At the time, Google said it would abide by censorship demands from democratically elected governments, but Chinese people did not have the ability to choose the leaders making the censorship demands. Google controls nearly two-thirds of the world’s search results, making it one of the biggest Internet gateways for more than a billion people around the world. So Google attempts to be transparent about the content it removes from the Web. The CNN reports the outcry over the latest blockage was swift and angry. Business travelers complained they will no longer be able to access email while in China without jumping through hoops. Their Chinese counterparts complained that it will now be more difficult to conduct business internationally. Access to Twitter (TWTR, Tech30), Facebook (FB, Tech30) and YouTube is blocked in China. During recent pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong, the Facebook-owned photo sharing app Instagram was blacked out on the Mainland.   Taken together, the restrictions constitute the world’s largest — and most effective — state-sponsored censorship program. The effort, officially called “Golden Shield,” is more than a decade old. The program allows the Chinese Communist Party to restrict content it deems sensitive (on democracy, Falun Gong, Tibet or the Uighur ethnic group, for example). Thousands of websites are blocked outright, and Chinese citizens that offend authorities can face judicial consequences. Only LinkedIn (LNKD, Tech30) has been allowed to operate in China — and only after it agreed to block content. For example, it took down posts earlier this year related to the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown. According to this ABC report from USA Today fighting the censors every step of the way is an army of self-described “hacktivists” such as Bill Xia, a Chinese-born software engineer who lives in North Carolina. Xia and others are engaged in a kind of technological arms race, inventing software and using other tactics to allow ordinary Chinese to beat the “Great Firewall of China” and access information on sensitive subjects such as Chinese human rights and Tibet, the province where pro-independence sentiment has boiled over in recent months.    ]]>

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