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Endgame approaching for One-Child-Policy?

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In November 2013 the first big change to the “One-Child-Policy” was announced by the Chinese regime, allowing couples to have two children if one parent is an only child.
The One-Child-Policy was introduced in 1979 by the Communist regime to alleviate the enduring social, economic, and environmental problems in the People’s Republic of China.
However, as stated by critics such as Republican U.S. senator of Florida, Marco Rubio, in his column published on Townhall.com, “It is one of the most disastrous and immoral social policies ever imagined in human history.”, which has resulted in horrific forced abortions, infanticide, child abandonment and human trafficking as reported by several NGOs.
“I was born in China under the one-child policy and it was a very isolated childhood. My parents had my sister after we immigrated to the west, and there’s an 11 year gap between us. It’s hard to envision what life would have been like on the road not taken”, stated an ethnic Chinese commenting on The Telegraph website.
Another gruesome side effect of the policy is the phenomenon of sex-selective abortions because of cultural norms that places greater value on boys. Moreover, Chinese women who gave birth to first-child baby girls are shunned by their husbands and families.
There have also been additional serious long-term consequences of China’s One-Child-Policy. The Economist reported there are about 13 million Chinese who lack household registration certificates because they were born in violation of the One-Child-Policy. “Not having this certificate means they can’t go to school, get a job, get married or do something as simple as check out library books. They have no access to China’s already flawed legal system. They can’t even escape this misery by buying plane or train tickets so they can relocate.
Over time, failing to register children at birth leaves them vulnerable to human trafficking and exploitation.”, Marco Rubio writes in Townhall.com.
Right now the policy change has been rolled out in 29 of China’s 33 provinces and regions. Perhaps this loosening of the decades old policy is the first tangible sign of change for the people in China.

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