Global Tuidang Center

GLOBAL SERVICE CENTER

for QUITTING THE CHINESE COMMUNIST PARTY

Uyghur Scholar in China Sentenced to Life in Prison

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on google
Google+

upload_6e431b94_4d91_471b_a6a5_7a85156fa90f_00007388-466006728901931839.tmp
blogger-tohti
A professor of economics at the Central University for Nationalities in Beijing, Tohti was convicted of “separatism” by a court in the Xinjiang capital of Urumqi. Tohti is a Muslim moderate and director of the Uiguhbiz.net website.
Uighurbiz, created in 2006, is known for its calls for dialogue between Uyghurs and the majority Han population. The site has been shut down repeatedly.
“Reporters Without Borders condemns this latest attack on freedom of information – the imprisoning of a man for his writings,” said Benjamin Ismaïl, head of the organization’s Asia-Pacific desk. “The Ilham Tohti case is representative of the massive arrests and ‘stadium trials’ on charges of ‘separatism’ and ‘terrorism’ that feed tensions between Uyghurs and Hans. The Chinese government must stop violence and intimidation campaigns against Uyghur journalists and netizens.”
Tohti was previously arrested in 2009 and held in a secret location for having relayed information about rioting in Xinjiang. On that occasion, no charges were brought against him, and the government said he was on vacation.
In January of this year, Tohti was arrested again. The move was probably prompted by his commentary on the Tiananmen “incident” of October 2013. Tohti, despite his moderate stance, was formally charged with “separatism” on 30 July.
Tohti has vowed to appeal his severe sentence. But the closing of his trial to foreign diplomats and international media, and heavy surveillance surrounding the proceedings, point to an unfair judicial process and to decisions made under heavy influence of the Chinese government.
World press freedom index 2014
China is ranked 175 of 180 countries in the 2014 Reporters Without Borders World Press Freedom Index.
According to Reporters without borders, China is also exporting it censorship methods.
Embarrassing officials or exposing corruption means risking public condemnation. Luo Changping, a journalist who was forced to leave Caijing magazine in November, Liu Hu, a New Express reporter who was arrested for disseminating “false information”, and the New York Times newspaper are among the recent examples of journalists and news media that have been punished for investigative reporting. Human rights activists and dissident bloggers such as Xu Zhiyong and Yang Maodong (also known as Guo Feixiong), who were jailed on trumped-up charges are among those who paid a high price in the past year.
The daily “directives” to the traditional media from the Department of Propaganda, the constant online censorship, the growing number of arbitrary arrests and the detention of the largest number of journalists and netizens in the world (including 2010 Nobel peace laureate Liu Xiaobo) have made China a model of censorship and repression.
Adoption of the model is unfortunately spreading in the region.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on google
Google+

Related

Recommended